Press "Enter" to skip to content

Take Part

Supported Will-Making – Research Volunteers Wanted!

  • Do you have an intellectual disability, sensory disability, learning disability, brain injury or dementia?
  • Would you like to talk to a researcher about making a will?

Volunteers are wanted to take part in a project about supported will-making.

We want to find out how disabled people and people with impairments that affect their ability to communicate or make choices could be supported to make a will. We are interested in hearing about your past experiences of will-making, the barriers you experience to making or changing your will, and the kinds of support you would find useful.

If you are interested, you can find out more by:

  1. Looking at the detailed Participant Information:
    Participant Information Sheet
    EasyRead Info Sheet
    If you require this information in a different format, please contact us and we will do our best to help.
  2. Sending the researchers an email: r.j.harding@bham.ac.uk
  3. Telephoning the researchers on: 0121 414 4960. If you phone, please leave a message with your name and a contact telephone number or email address.

Or you can fill in the Enquiry Form and we will get in touch with you as soon as we can.

This research is funded by the University of Birmingham ESRC Impact Acceleration Account. This funding is provided by the Economic and Social Research Council, and allocated by the University of Birmingham.
The research is organised by Birmingham Law School, at the University of Birmingham. It has ethical approval from the University of Birmingham Humanities and Social Sciences Research Ethics Committee.

Everyday Decisions

The Everyday Decisions research project involved interviews with disabled people and with care professionals. We have now completed our interviews, and have published our research findings.

The Everyday Decisions research project was funded by the British Academy and carried out by researchers at the University of Birmingham. It received ethical approval from the University of Birmingham Humanities and Social Sciences Research Ethics Committee.

Share